Mrsa Treatment | This Flu Season, MRSA Treatment Recommended For Kids With Serious Respiratory ...


Doctors seeing children presenting with serious lower respiratory tract infections during this flu season are urged by researchers to give the MRSA antibiotic. The researchers base their request on a recently released study demonstrating that methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection with the influenza virus is a deadly combination that resulted in numerous deaths of children during the 2009 flu season.

This week, researchers from Children’s Hospital Boston published their findings in an article in the medical journal Pediatrics their discovery that simultaneous co-infection of the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with the flu virus increased the risk of previously healthy children succumbing to flu-related mortality by 8-fold.


MRSA infection alone is typically treated successfully with the antibiotic vancomycin. However, in the study, the researchers found that co-infection with the flu virus developed into unexpected complications and death where antibiotic treatment was too often unsuccessful.

“There’s more risk for MRSA to become invasive in the presence of flu or other viruses,” says study leader Adrienne Randolph, MD at Children’s Hospital Boston. “These deaths in co-infected children are a warning sign.”

The most surprising find was that while children with pre-existing medical conditions such as asthma or compromised immune systems are known to be particularly susceptible, up to 30 percent of those co-infected in the study were previously healthy. “It is not common in the U.S. to lose a previously healthy child to pneumonia,” says Randolph.

“Unfortunately, these children had necrotizing pneumonia ” eating away at their tissue and killing off whole areas of the lung. They looked like immunocompromised patients in the way MRSA went through their body. It’s not that flu alone can’t kill ” it can ” but in most cases children with flu alone


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